Transcript: Rachel Smith on Drawing in Class at TEDxUFM

July 8, 2016 11:38 am | By More

The following is the full transcript of Rachel Smith’s TEDx Talk titled “Drawing in Class” at TEDxUFM event.

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Rachel S. Smith – Senior Consultant and the Director of Digital Facilitation Services

When I was in high school, I was a pretty good student and I took very good notes. And my teachers really appreciated that.

My notes looked a lot like this most of the time. So you look at these notes and you say to yourself “This is great. This student is clearly paying attention in my class.” That’s what it looks like.

The trouble is that sometimes, my notes looked a little more like this. And this was a little hard, a little more problematic, because to the teachers it looked like I was drawing in class. And so I would get a different reaction.

But for me, it was just as easy to listen closely to what the teacher was saying if I was drawing images as it was if I was writing words. Sometimes, it was actually easier for me to listen and pay attention if my hand was doing something, and it didn’t matter if the images that were coming out had anything to do with what I was hearing. It was just easier for me to focus if I was drawing.

But teachers would stand in the front of the room and see me in the back of the room, because my last name started with an S and so I was always in the back. And they would say, “She’s drawing in class again.” And they’d make me stop and then they’d make me stand up in front of the class and recite some exercises to induce me to pay attention better next time.

And maybe, after class, I’d have to stay and clean off the blackboard and then I’d always get the same lecture which went something like this: “Rachel, you’re such a good student, but if you don’t pay attention, you’re not going to do well.”

Guess what I do for a living now? Any guesses? 25 years later, it turns out that what I do for a living is pay attention. I get up in front of a group and the group talks, and while they’re doing that, I pay attention. And I pay attention totally, and completely, and with everything that I am.

And while I’m paying attention to what the group is saying, I take notes. And those notes look something like this. This is called graphic recording. I use huge sheets of paper on the wall, and I use big markers, and I listen to the group’s conversation and I record it, using words and images.

Sometimes there are more words and sometimes there are more images, but usually the notes come out looking something like this. This helps the group in several ways: It lets them see what they’re doing, it lets them see their work in a way that’s not normally possible in a meeting or a conversation. It lets them see the big picture together. They can make connections between pieces of information that come up at different times in the meeting. They can follow the thread of a conversation through a multi-day meeting because it’s all around them on the walls, all the time. It really helps the group to see what they’re accomplishing as they do it, and that’s my contribution. I make the group’s work visible.

I also use visual note-taking to take my own personal notes, when I’m listening to speeches, or lectures, or meetings, what have you. A couple of things are different than when I was in high school. I’m using different tools, so my notes look a little different. I also draw on an internal library of images that I’ve developed over the years and that I carry with me, that I can just draw very quickly when I need them. They’re just ready for me to use.

And I’ve gotten better at pulling out the key points that speakers are making, I’ve had a lot more practice. And I’ve stopped worrying that people are going to make me stay after the meeting and clean up because I’ve been drawing.

Any type of note-taking is designed to help the student take what they’re hearing and hook it to their internal frame of reference. That’s how learning occurs. You take new information and hook it to old information you already have.

When you take notes, it’s very possible to write down word for word exactly what the teacher’s saying and not understand any of it. Has that happened to any of you? I know it’s happened to me — where I have no clue what’s going on, so I just write it all down and hope I can figure it out later.

When you’re using visual note-taking though, you have to listen to what’s being said, you have to really hear it, and you have to understand it, because that’s the only way you’re going to come up with an image that connects what you’re hearing with what you already know in your mind.

Visual note-taking opens the door for more playful connections between information, for students to use their imaginations in an activity that can often be very passive: note-taking. It also helps students to create a personal visual memory aid that they can study from later, they can look at, and tell themselves the story again.

When a teacher is teaching, what they’re doing, really, is telling a story about something they’re passionate about. And when a student takes visual notes, what they’re doing is making that story visible. When taking visual notes, the critical thing is that your images are very quick and easy to draw, and that they’re relevant to the content that’s being said. If you find yourself doing a really, really detailed image, and it has nothing to do with what the speaker’s currently saying, and this happens to every visual note-taker at some point, then you’ve lost track of what’s going on, you’ve fallen behind, and what you need to do is stop, leave a space, move on and keep up with the speaker.

When I was taking the notes here, the speaker that I was listening to, Chris Schunn, was talking about the difference between low-success teams and high-success teams, and you can see that in the lower portion of the slide here. And I had this image of how I wanted to represent his description, of what those two teams were like, but I didn’t have time while he was talking to work it out because I hadn’t had those postures of the people that you see here. That wasn’t in my image library already.

So I left a space and I went on with him, which is good, because if I hadn’t, if I’d tried to work out that drawing right then, I would’ve ended up missing the take-home points of the lecture which is the important thing, that’s what you want to know, this is what the speaker wants you to walk away with.

So I waited until he was finished and when the talk was over, I went back and I worked out the drawings the way that I want them. And now when I look at them, they remind me of the descriptions that he used because this is the image that came to my mind when he was saying that.

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Category: Education

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