The Unsexy Truth, The Hookup Culture: Lisa Bunnage (Full Transcript)

I couldn’t deal with it. But my point with that is it’s always going to be awkward and embarrassing. I’m not one of those people, even when I’m talking to teenagers, I don’t think it should be blasé.

I still think sex is– there’s an element: if it’s awkward to talk about it, it just is. It’s just natural to feel that way. So, when you are talking to kids though it’s a little bit– There’s a couple of rules that I tell my clients I say, “When you’re talking to kids, it’s age appropriate.” A three-year-old doesn’t need to know the same things as a 13-year-old.

Just say to them, “We’ll discuss it when you’re older.” That’s it, and then go bake some cookies, whatever.

But also: you don’t discuss your sex life. Your three-year-old does not need to know what Mom and Dad are doing rolling around in the hay. It’s just not necessary. They will ask questions though; it’s not appropriate.

So, in order to change the norm, I think we have to learn how to talk about it. And if you have to bake cookies, racks and racks of cookies, then do so, but don’t let that stop you from discussing these things with your children.

Thank you very much.

 

Recommended Book/Course for Further Reading:

Neuroscience for parents: How to raise amazing kids


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