Home » I’m not your inspiration, thank you very much: Stella Young (Transcript)

I’m not your inspiration, thank you very much: Stella Young (Transcript)

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Stella Young at TED Talks

Australian comedian Stella Young’s TED Talk Transcript:

I grew up in a very small country town in Victoria.

I had a very normal, low-key kind of upbringing. I went to school, I hung out with my friends, I fought with my younger sisters. It was all very normal.

And when I was 15, a member of my local community approached my parents and wanted to nominate me for a community achievement award. And my parents said, “Hm, that’s really nice, but there’s kind of one glaring problem with that. She hasn’t actually achieved anything.”

And they were right. You know I went to school, I got good marks, I had a very low-key after school job in my mum’s hairdressing salon, and I spent a lot of time watching “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and “Dawson’s Creek.” Yeah, I know What a contradiction.

But they were right, you know. I wasn’t doing anything that was out of the ordinary at all.

I wasn’t doing anything that could be considered an achievement if you took disability out of the equation.

Years later, I was on my second teaching round in a Melbourne high school, and I was about 20 minutes into a year 11 legal studies class when this boy put up his hand and said, “Hey miss, when are you going to start doing your speech?”

And I said, “What speech?”

You know, I’d been talking them about defamation law for a good 20 minutes. And he said, “You know, like, your motivational speaking. You know, when people in wheelchairs come to school, they usually say, like, inspirational stuff? It’s usually in the big hall.”

And that’s when it dawned on me: This kid had only ever experienced disabled people as objects of inspiration. We are not, to this kid — and it’s not his fault, I mean, that’s true for many of us.

For lots of us, disabled people are not our teachers or our doctors or our manicurists. We’re not real people. We are there to inspire.

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And in fact, I am sitting on this stage looking like I do in this wheelchair, and you are probably kind of expecting me to inspire you. Right? Yeah.

Well, ladies and gentlemen, I’m afraid I’m going to disappoint you dramatically. I am not here to inspire you. I am here to tell you that we have been lied to about disability.

Yeah, we’ve been sold the lie that disability is a Bad Thing, capital B, capital T. It’s a bad thing, and to live with a disability makes you exceptional.

It’s not a bad thing, and it doesn’t make you exceptional. And in the past few years, we’ve been able to propagate this lie even further via social media. You may have seen images like this one: “The only disability in life is a bad attitude.”

Or this one: “Your excuse is invalid.” Indeed.

Or this one: “Before you quit, try!”

These are just a couple of examples, but there are a lot of these images out there. You know, you might have seen the one, the little girl with no hands drawing a picture with a pencil held in her mouth.

You might have seen a child running on carbon fiber prosthetic legs. And these images, there are lots of them out there, they are what we call inspiration porn.

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