Lana Mazahreh: 3 Thoughtful Ways to Conserve Water (Transcript)

Here is the full transcript of Lana Mazahreh’s talk: 3 Thoughtful Ways to Conserve Water at TED conference. 


In March 2017, the mayor of Cape Town officially declared Cape Town a local disaster, as it had less than four months left of usable water. Residents were restricted to 100 liters of water per person, per day.

But what does that really mean? With 100 liters of water per day, you can take a five-minute shower, wash your face twice and probably flush the toilet about five times. You still didn’t brush your teeth, you didn’t do laundry, and you definitely didn’t water your plants. You, unfortunately, didn’t wash your hands after those five toilet flushes. And you didn’t even take a sip of water. The mayor described this as that it means a new relationship with water.

Today, seven months later, I can share two things about my second home with you. First: Cape Town hasn’t run out of water just yet. But as of September 3rd, the hundred-liter limit dropped to 87 liters. The mayor defined the city’s new normal as one of permanent drought.

Second: what’s happening in Cape Town is pretty much coming to many other cities and countries in the world. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, excluding countries that we don’t have data for, less than five percent of the world’s population is living in a country that has more water today than it did 20 years ago.

Everyone else is living in a country that has less water today. And nearly one out of three are living in a country that is facing a water crisis. I grew up in Jordan, a water-poor country that has experienced absolute water scarcity since 1973. And still, in 2017, only 10 countries in the world have less water than Jordan.

So dealing with a lack of water is quite ingrained in my soul. As soon as I was old enough to learn how to write my name, I also learned that I need to conserve water. My parents would constantly remind my siblings and I to close the tap when we brushed our teeth. We used to fill balloons with flour instead of water when we played. It’s just as much fun, though.

ALSO READ:   Just Climb Through It by Ashima Shiraishi at TEDxTeen (Full Transcript)

And a few years ago, when my friends and I were dared to do the Ice Bucket Challenge, we did that with sand. And you might think that, you know, that’s easy, sand is not ice cold I promise you, sand goes everywhere, and it took ages to get rid of it. But what perhaps I didn’t realize as I played with flour balloons as a child, and as I poured sand on my head as an adult, is that some of the techniques that seem second nature to me and to others who live in dry countries might help us all address what is fast becoming a global crisis.

I wish to share three lessons today, three lessons from water-poor countries and how they survived and even thrived despite their water crisis.

Lesson one: tell people how much water they really have. In order to solve a problem, we need to acknowledge that we have one. And when it comes to water, people can easily turn a blind eye, pretending that since water is coming out of the tap now, everything will be fine forever. But some smart, drought-affected countries have adopted simple, innovative measures to make sure their citizens, their communities and their companies know just how dry their countries are.

When I was in Cape Town earlier this year, I saw this electronic billboard on the freeway, indicating how much water the city had left. This is an idea they may well have borrowed from Australia when it faced one of the worst droughts of the country’s history from 1997 to 2009.

Water levels in Melbourne dropped to a very low capacity of almost 26 percent. But the city didn’t yell at people. It didn’t plead with them not to use water. They used electronic billboards to flash available levels of water to all citizens across the city.

They were honestly telling people how much water they really have, and letting them take responsibility for themselves. By the end of the drought, this created such a sense of urgency as well as a sense of community. Nearly one out of three citizens in Melbourne had invested in installing rainwater holding tanks for their own households. Actions that citizens took didn’t stop at installing those tanks. With help from the city, they were able to do something even more impactful.

ALSO READ:   Transcript: Michaela DePrince on from ‘devil’s child’ to star ballerina at TEDxAmsterdam 2014

Taking me to lesson two: empower people to save water. Melbourne wanted people to spend less water in their homes. And one way to do that is to spend less time in the shower. However, interviews revealed that some people, women in particular, weren’t keen on saving water that way. Some of them honestly said, “The shower is not just to clean up. It’s my sanctuary. It’s a space I go to relax, not just clean up.”

So the city started offering water-efficient showerheads for free. And then, now some people complained that the showerheads looked ugly or didn’t suit their bathrooms. So what I like to call “The Showerhead Team” developed a small water-flow regulator that can be fitted into existing showerheads.

And although showerhead beauty doesn’t matter much to me, I loved how the team didn’t give up and instead came up with a simple, unique solution to empower people to save water. Within a span of four years, more than 460,000 showerheads were replaced. When the small regulator was introduced, more than 100,000 orders of that were done. Melbourne succeeded in reducing the water demands per capita by 50 percent.

Pages: 1 | 2 | Single Page View