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Home » What Representing Men in Divorce Taught Me About Fatherhood: Marilyn York (Transcript)

What Representing Men in Divorce Taught Me About Fatherhood: Marilyn York (Transcript)

Here is the full transcript and summary of Marilyn York’s talk titled “What Representing Men in Divorce Taught Me About Fatherhood” at TEDxUniversityofNevada conference.

In this TEDx talk, Marilyn York emphasizes the crucial role that fathers play in children’s lives, pointing out that they have a genetic bond and influence that is necessary for their development, despite nearly two of every five children in America growing up without their fathers. York also discusses the bias against fathers in the family court system, calling for changes to paternity laws to protect children born out of wedlock. She calls on everyone to help the remaining 17 million fatherless children avoid tragic fates such as incarceration, drug abuse, and suicide.

Listen to the audio version here:

TRANSCRIPT:

I’m six years old, and all I can think about is getting the pink Barbie Corvette. I need five more dollars. Luckily for me, it’s Easter, and I know that my dad always hides one coveted five-dollar egg. I also know the best egg is the hardest to find.

This year, I’m ready. Before long, I spot it, right in the middle of my sweet 70s swing set pole. You know, the one that runs along the entire top of the set. I scramble to get the ladder and the yardstick, and duct tape it to a broom handle.

I fish it into the pipe, and I shove that egg hard. It flies out the other side, and by the time it hits the ground, I’m waiting above it like an expectant father. The egg cracks open, and inside is the very opposite of my grand prize. Instead, a perfectly formed dog turd rolls out.

I burst into loud hysterics, at the same time my father explodes with laughter. I run as fast as I can to my room, but he’s not far behind. It’s time for one of his talks. Honey, it was clear that you already learned the important life lesson. The harder you work, the better the payoff, so it was time that you learn another valuable lesson. Sometimes, no matter how hard you work, you just end up with shit. And who better to teach just this sort of hard-hitting, direct, and painful life lesson to six-year-old me than my father?

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