Why We Should Rethink Our Relationship With The Smartphone: Lior Frenkel (Transcript)

Following is the full transcript of technologist Lior Frenkel’s TEDx Talk: Why We Should Rethink Our Relationship With The Smartphone at TEDxBG conference. Lior Frenkel is Co-Founder and CEO of the nuSchool, and the founder of UNDIGITIZE.ME – a social project dealing with Smartphone addiction. To learn more about the speaker, read the bio here.

 

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Lior Frenkel – Founder, UNDIGITIZE.ME

Hi everyone.

Just before I start, I’d like all of you to take your smartphones and show it to me, where is it in your hands please, and I will take a picture of that. Because that is what I do every time before I speak.

Okay. Are you ready?

Okay. Thank you. Now please put it the deepest pocket you can.

Okay. I came here today to talk to you about an addiction — one that many of us share but we usually ignore. And I’m speaking about the smartphone addiction.

A year ago, I was working for a start-up. We developed an iPhone application who tried to get you the best videos from all around the web. We wanted to make people entertained and happy and excited during the day. But we also wanted to make some money.

And with you that the best way to make some money is if as many people as possible will use the application for as many minutes a day.

So I signed up for this workshop which was all about how to get people hooked to your app. They showed us how with negative emotions, like being lonely or bored or dissatisfied, you can use them as internal triggers and get people try your app and then stay there for as long as possible.

In the middle of the workshop, something changed in me. I raised my head. I looked around me, and I saw 80 other people sharing the same goal I have: get people hooked to their apps. And I started to feel uncomfortable and that was because, me — I am a smartphone addict myself.

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So this is how my mornings used to look like. Waking up, turning off the alarm clock, and then dealing with dozens of notifications: WhatsApp, Facebook, Instagram, email — working email from my boss, my colleagues, et cetera.

And then an hour later I find myself still in bed in my boxer shorts in a very uncomfortable posture. My teeth are not brushed. I didn’t have a shower or coffee yet. What is going on?

So I decided I need to change, and I came up with this project: UNDIGITIZE.ME which is all about raising awareness to smartphone addiction.

I then started to collect some data. I wanted to see if other people have the same problems like I do and I found that indeed they do.

Well, apparently most of us – well, the average user — is checking his smartphone at least 110 times a day. And at Stanford, they found out that three-quarters of the students said they would rather forget their wallet than their iPhone when they go out of the home. And the same around of people said they are falling asleep with their phone.

But it’s not just about me and my phone; it’s also a social thing, right? Pacific Bell Wireless, a big phone company, back in 1999 did a survey. They asked people if they find it rude to use phone in public. More than 90% said they find it really rude to use the phone in restaurants, at the dinner, at the movies, in the classroom – well, where everyone else is.

But now 15 years later, it became so common for people to use the phone around others, we already have a special word for it. It’s called phubbing. It’s when you snub someone who sits next to you or in front of you, or maybe even talking to you by using your phone.

So I wanted to know: Is it a real addiction? Can we call it an addiction? Because you could say this is just a lot of use. Apparently there are some similarities between the smartphone addiction to other addictions.

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For example, when a smoker can’t get his cigarette, he feels stressful; he feels anxious. It’s the same for an alcoholic who can’t get his drink. And apparently we feel stressed when we can’t get our phone or when our battery is about to die. You probably know this feeling.

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