Home » How Stress is Killing Us & How You Can Stop It: Thijs Launspach (Transcript)

How Stress is Killing Us & How You Can Stop It: Thijs Launspach (Transcript)

Thijs Launspach at TEDxUniversiteitVanAmsterdam

Full text of psychologist Thijs Launspach’s talk: How stress is killing us (and how you can stop it) at TEDxUniversiteitVanAmsterdam conference. In this talk, Thijs explores and explains the causes and consequences stress in our lives, and some practical solutions to reduce stress in life.

Thijs Launspach is a psychologist who has written two books: Quarterlife, about the quarterlifer crisis, and The Millenial Manifesto, about the societal factors which lead to the high prevalence of mental health issues among young people.

Listen to the MP3 Audio here:

TRANSCRIPT:

Thijs Launspach – Psychologist

Fish are remarkable creatures. They’re acutely aware of their surroundings. They can smell predators from miles away and they know the availability of food or potential mates.

And yet there’s one thing fish are not aware of. What’s that? They’re in water, right.

So I think there are certain similarities between fish and us, people. I think human beings also don’t notice some of the important things into our lives. And I want to talk to you about two of those things:

One is: A good life is a busy life.

And the second is: Levels of stress, even, dangerous levels of stress are acceptable and they are normal.

So our lives are getting more busy than ever. And part of this we like, right?  We feel productive. We sort of like the frantic pace as well. There’s never a dull moment and we like that about it.

But there are… as a psychologist, I can see a different side of the same coin, which is stress and even unhealthy amounts of stress that are becoming normal for us today.

So let’s do a little experiment. Can I have some house lights on as well? So let me see you. Okay, let me ask you some questions. Yes there you are.

So the first one is, raise your hand if this applies to you:

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Are you affected by burn-out, either personally or by someone else close to you? Who among you?

That’s a fair amount.

Okay, so next question:

Does stress have a negative impact on one of the following things: amount of sleep? Who among you.

Wow. That’s a lot.

Okay, Diet? Okay.

Amount of exercise that you have? Okay.

And the amount of spare time that you have in your life? Okay, that’s most of you basically.

So, the next one, the million dollar question:

Who among you would think that they would be a happier person if they’d only be less busy or less stressed in life?

Okay. Wow. That’s a lot of you.

So let us look at another sort of point in this one. Let me walk you through these figures. I think you might know them.

These are burnout symptoms in the Netherlands, like from the Central Bureau of Statistics in 2016. And they’re split by age groups and by sex as well.

So you have the light blue, those are the males and dark blue are the females. And I apologize that they are in Dutch. The age group is 15 to 25, 25 to 35, etc.

So, what you see here… one of the first things to notice is that apart from pensioners and well high school students and sort of college students as well, the amount of burnout is about 15%. This is lifetime prevalence.

And another thing to notice is that 25 to 35 years old, there’s significantly more burnout. So this is a problem.

And this is a problem if you think that most people don’t really even get to the stage of burnout, but are stressed in their lives for years and years and years.

So a couple of the different things that are associated with stress are: a weaker immune system, obesity and other diet related problems, even some forms of cancer; some types of cancer, and even in some studies premature death. So serious, serious stuff.

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So, there are a couple of things. Well, for me, the question is WHY. I’m a psychologist. I like to investigate stuff.

So why are we at this frantic pace?

Well, it turns out it’s not one thing. It’s multiple things. It’s a lot of things.

So let’s start by our jobs. It’s one of the most obvious places to look for a work related stress. So our jobs are getting more and more complicated. We work more overtime than ever.

We spend an average of two plus hours emailing every day, often on top of a regular workload.

And the boundaries between our working hours in our spare time are crumbling because we can access our email and our stuff from home. So that’s our job.

Then our daily lives are getting more and more frantic as well. So we suffer from FOMO, which I’m sure you know FOMO – Fear of missing out, which means that we put all kinds of different activities and we try to put it in a limited space of our day, which means that we live on a frantic pace. And that we sort of lack the opportunity to relax in between as well.

Well, to add insult to injury as the previous speaker talked about as well, we are addicted to these things, which take up every spare moment that we do have. So that’s bad stuff.

And also between our ears, we get busier as well. So there are psychological elements at play. For example, the expectations that we have about ourselves. So we need ourselves to be attractive, fit, healthy, financially successful, socially successful and happy all of the time, every day. Or else we feel like losers. So that’s a bad thing.

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