Google IO 2012 Keynote – Day 2 (Full Transcript)

 

Introducing Speaker: Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome back Vic Gundotra.

Vic Gundotra: Wow! Good morning, everybody. This place is packed. I’m surprised so many of you made it back after that great party last night.

You know, let me begin by just thanking you guys for your support. Yesterday was an epic day for Google I/O. It was quite an amazing day. And just thank you for being part of that. I hope you enjoyed it as much as we did.

And I hope you’re enjoying your Android development kits. Yes?

All right. You know, that party last night, thank you for many of you who downloaded the new version of Google+ for Android and then accepted my invitation. We had over 2600 of you do that. And of those 2600 people, over 1,000 people turned on Party Mode and contributed over 13,700 photographs from last night’s concert.

When was the last time you went to an event and the next day had that many photos automatically organized and chronological. I have to apologize. This is not Glass that’s distracting me. Ever since yesterday, I’ve developed just this nervous TIC. I am just always wondering, where is Sergey? I’m not sure if he’s in the building, if he’s above the building.

As you probably know, he’s going to do some fun stuff again today. I hope you’ve been following his Google+ posts. But I think you’re likely to see some pretty exciting stuff.

With that, let’s get started with Day 2 keynote.

I think you’re going to be really excited about what you’re going to see here. That’s going to be handled by our senior vice president of Chrome and apps, and my friend, Sundar Pichai. Sundar?

Sundar Pichai: Thank you. Welcome to Day 2 of Google I/O keynote. It’s very exciting to be here. None of what I have planned involved jumping from an airplane, doing anything on top of Moscone or riding onto the stage. But we nevertheless have lots of exciting stuff ahead. In fact, we’ve had a few exciting months. But a few months ago, we launched Chrome for Android, which, hopefully, all of you can use on your brand-new Nexus 7.

ALSO READ:   Cisco Keynote at 2014 International CES by CEO John Chambers (Transcript)

About 10 weeks ago, we launched Google Drive. And just about three weeks ago, we launched a whole new next-generation line of Samsung Chromebooks. And we are just getting started. What we thought we’d do today was to take a step back, talk to you about the journey we are on and where we are going next. I’m primarily going to be talking about Chrome and our cloud applications, our journey to help you all live online in the cloud seamlessly.

We’ll also talk about the Web platform, what we are doing so that developers like you can write great Web applications. So let’s get started. The chart behind me shows the growth of the World Wide Web, shows the growth of traffic, the Internet traffic. And as you can see is the top line is the total traffic. It’s exploded.

In fact, since the advent of broadband, it’s grown a lot and reached today over 2.3 billion users, a staggering number. But the good news is, this is only one-third of the world’s population. And the way we are going to get to the rest of the world is through mobile. That’s what the second line shows.

With the advent of smartphones and better connectivity, increasingly, people are accessing the Web for the first time ever on their phones. And with the help of mobile, we are going to reach the entire world’s population. In fact, it’s expected in about four years there are going to be around 20 billion network connections, about 2.5 network connections for every user in the world. We are in the middle of a revolution. At Google, we saw this trend coming, which is why we built Chrome. About three and a half years ago, we launched Chrome as a browser to help showcase the modern Web. And we are very excited and humbled to see that option.

ALSO READ:   Full Transcript: Presidential Debate September 26, 2016 Donald Trump vs Hillary Clinton

Thanks to a lot of users and developers like you, about two years ago at Google I/O, we announced that we have 70 million weekly active users. A year ago, we announced we had doubled to 160 million active users. And as of today, we have almost doubled again, to 310 million active users.

What matters, though, is that how people use Chrome. They live on it every day. Every single day, there are over 60 billion words typed in Chrome. That is the equivalent of 100,000 textbooks, or one terrabyte of data, documents, text, images, videos are downloaded every single day.

And, finally, something which is near and dear to my heart, Chrome is all about speed. Just one feature in Chrome, the fact that when you’re typing in the Omnibox, we try to guess where you go, prefetch and prerender the page. That feature alone saves 13 years of human lifetime every single day in Chrome.

And we have hundreds of such features in the product. We are very humbled by this momentum. There’s a lot of conversation about share, et cetera. By our internal metrics and everything we see out there, Chrome is the most popular browser in the world globally.

The landscape has changed pretty significantly since we launched Chrome. At the time we launched Chrome, most of you were using the browser on a single computer. It was primarily the desktop Web. Fast forward to today. Almost all of you have smartphones. You have a computer at home, at work, you share your devices with family and friends, and increasingly, you’re buying tablets. So Chrome was built for a better Web. But for today’s Web, we want to make sure Chrome acts as a layer so that your Web is personalized, works consistent and seamlessly across all your devices.

Pages: First | 1 | 2 | 3 | ... | Next → | Last | Single Page View

Leave a Comment

Scroll to Top