Rachel Kolb: Navigating Deafness in a Hearing World at TEDxStanford (Transcript)

 

Here is the full transcript of Stanford graduate and Rhodes scholar Rachel Kolb’s TEDx Talk: Navigating Deafness in a Hearing World at TEDxStanford conference.

 

Rachel Kolb – Stanford graduate and Rhodes scholar

I never thought I would be here today. My invitation to speak at TEDx clashed with some of my previous conceptions of what I can and can’t do.

I was born profoundly deaf, and learning to speak was not easy. Think about it for a second: when you can’t hear, how do you learn to speak? I could have chosen to use sign language today instead, if that would have been a perfectly viable choice. But for me the answer was 18 years of speech therapy. And at the very beginning that speech therapy was very physical. I spent a lot of time putting my hands on my speech therapist’s throat, to feel the vibrations when she spoke.

I learned that the sounds ‘m’ and ‘n’ are nasal. Try it for yourself, ‘m’, ‘n’. And I used that information to correct myself. I’ve always known that my speech isn’t perfect, but week after week I’d go back to try to make it better. I did this even when I had come to terms with my own difference.

Even now, oftentimes, I’ll meet a new person, and that person will look at me and say: “I can’t quite place your accent. Are you from England?” Or they’ll ask me, “Are you from Australia?” Or even, “Are you from Scandinavia?” I have other places.

And I say, “No, I’m from New Mexico”. It can be fun to be perceived as more exotic than I actually am. But, despite all of that, there have been people who have not encouraged me to speak like this.

When I was in middle school, I gave a presentation to my history class about Renaissance painters, like this guy. I practiced the presentation with one of my best friends, and on the day of, I walked in and I gave it without an interpreter. It took a considerable amount of courage for me to do this. And I felt like it had gone well until a few days later when I got feedback from the teacher.

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I don’t remember what she said verbatim, but it was something like this: “You should never speak like that in front of a group without an interpreter. It is not fair to anyone who has to listen to you.”

Now, I want to believe that this teacher meant well, but I was shattered. I felt like my attempt to communicate clearly was an utter failure. And I’m starting this way, because as a deaf person, there are many things I’ve been told I can’t do. Either by other people, or by that internal voice we all have.

Society has a tendency to focus on disability rather than ability. And certainly, my abilities are different from many other people’s abilities. I wear a hearing aid in this ear, and a cochlear implant in this one, if I take both of them off, I can’t hear at all. I can’t talk on the phone; I can’t communicate exactly like everyone else.

I use lip reading and sign language instead. But over time I’ve come to perceive myself as far more able than disabled. A large part of this is not taking my challenges as outright limitations.

Another part of it is simply believing that I can. That’s what I decided to do when I accepted the speaking invitation for TEDx, and that’s what I want to talk about today.

I was born to hearing parents, who did not know sign language, and who knew almost nothing about deafness when they had me. This is not too uncommon among children who are born deaf. About 2 to 3 out of every 1,000 children in the United States are born deaf or hard-of-hearing. Nine out of every 10 children who are born deaf, are born to parents who can hear. Of those families, only 10% ever learn to communicate effectively with their deaf child, by which I mean Sign Language, cued speech, other means like that. The other 90% do not.

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Just think about the implications of that deaf children born to hearing parents are less likely to develop fluent written English than deaf children born to deaf parents. On average, deaf children born to deaf parents have a higher level of achievement: they score higher in other academic areas, and demonstrate greater independence and better social skills. Only a third of deaf children complete high school.

Out of the deaf individuals who do attend college, only a fifth complete their studies. On the whole, deaf adults earn about a third less than their hearing peers. These statistics tell a story of a fundamental misunderstanding. I’ll give it to you straight: deaf people are capable of doing anything hearing people can do, except hear. But communicating when you can’t hear exactly like everyone else is not the same as communicating if you are a typically hearing person.

And communication is so important. When I was born, my parents valued communication in a variety of forms: they learned sign language, they gave me other tools like speech therapy, but they also had other people there to support them. When I was 18 months old, I walked out of a speech therapy session, and my speech therapist pulled my mother aside: “I want to tell you something,” she said, “never put limitations on this child. She could do anything she wants to.” And my mother never forgot that.

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