Falling in Love is the Easy Part by Mandy Len Catron (Full Transcript)

Transcript of Falling in Love is the Easy Part by Mandy Len Catron @ TED Talks…

 

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Mandy Len Catron – Writer

I published this article in the New York Times Modern Love column in January of this year. “To Fall in Love With Anyone, Do This.” And the article is about a psychological study designed to create romantic love in the laboratory, and my own experience trying the study myself one night last summer.

So the procedure is fairly simple: two strangers take turns asking each other 36 increasingly personal questions and then they stare into each other’s eyes without speaking for four minutes.

So here are a couple of sample questions.

Number 12: If you could wake up tomorrow having gained any one quality or ability, what would it be?

Number 28: When did you last cry in front of another person? Or By yourself? As you can see, they really do get more personal as they go along.

Number 30, I really like this one: Tell your partner what you like about them; be very honest this time, saying things you might not say to someone you just met.

So when I first came across this study a few years earlier, one detail really stuck out to me, and that was the rumor that two of the participants had gotten married six months later, and they’d invited the entire lab to the ceremony. So I was of course very skeptical about this process of just manufacturing romantic love, but of course I was intrigued. And when I got the chance to try this study myself, with someone I knew but not particularly well, I wasn’t expecting to fall in love. But then we did, and —

And I thought it made a good story, so I sent it to the Modern Love column a few months later.

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Now, this was published in January, and now it is August, so I’m guessing that some of you are probably wondering, are we still together? And the reason I think you might be wondering this is because I have been asked this question again and again and again for the past seven months. And this question is really what I want to talk about today. But let’s come back to it.

So the week before the article came out, I was very nervous. I had been working on a book about love stories for the past few years, so I had gotten used to writing about my own experiences with romantic love on my blog. But a blog post might get a couple hundred views at the most, and those were usually just my Facebook friends, and I figured my article in the New York Times would probably get a few thousand views. And that felt like a lot of attention on a relatively new relationship. But as it turned out, I had no idea.

So the article was published online on a Friday evening, and by Saturday, this had happened to the traffic on my blog. And by Sunday, both the Today Show and Good Morning America had called. Within a month, the article would receive over 8 million views, and I was, to say the least, underprepared for this sort of attention. It’s one thing to work up the confidence to write honestly about your experiences with love, but it is another thing to discover that your love life has made international news — and to realize that people across the world are genuinely invested in the status of your new relationship.

And when people called or emailed, which they did every day for weeks, they always asked the same question first: are you guys still together? In fact, as I was preparing this talk, I did a quick search of my email inbox for the phrase “Are you still together?” and several messages popped up immediately. They were from students and journalists and friendly strangers like this one. I did radio interviews and they asked. I even gave a talk, and one woman shouted up to the stage, “Hey Mandy, where’s your boyfriend?” And I promptly turned bright red.

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I understand that this is part of the deal. If you write about your relationship in an international newspaper, you should expect people to feel comfortable asking about it. But I just wasn’t prepared for the scope of the response. The 36 questions seem to have taken on a life of their own. In fact, the New York Times published a follow-up article for Valentine’s Day, which featured readers’ experiences of trying the study themselves, with varying degrees of success.

So my first impulse in the face of all of this attention was to become very protective of my own relationship. I said no to every request for the two of us to do a media appearance together. I turned down TV interviews, and I said no to every request for photos of the two us. I think I was afraid that we would become inadvertent icons for the process of falling in love, a position I did not at all feel qualified for.

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